Heal Your Church WebSite


Teaching, rebuking, correcting & training in righteous web design.

‘Pelase’ Proof Read

They say a picture is worth 1000 words.
‘Pelase’ don’t say something like this on your web church’s site
(the sign is bad enough):

Don't let worries kill you - Let the church help.

  • Always test your new code.
  • Mistakes like can really detract from your site’s content …
  • I always get the help of a third partly before going live.

NOTE – Sorry guys, but I’m recycling an old article for new commentary. First, because it was published almost two years ago, second because I’m very tired, and though I have some geek things to say … I’m falling asleep on the keyboard.

10 Comments

  1. So, April 30, 2004??? Recycling the future ;->

  2. Please tell me it says “I always get the help of a third partly before going live.” as a joke. Please?

  3. And to follow up on Sparticus’ comment, “Mistakes like can really …” is a dropped word or a throwback to the “valley speak” days, right?

    I still like the sign I saw several years ago, trite as it might have been:

    Welcome to Ch–ch. What’s missing?

  4. and

    “on your web church’s site”

  5. Laughing OUT LOUD!!! :)

  6. Proof-readers is always preferrable, but when you’re a one-man-show on a shoesting-budget it’s not a luxury we can all afford. 8^)

  7. Yes, of course included some typos.

    It was supposed to enhance the humor, not give you guys a chance to gang up on me while I’m outta town.

    Sheesh, miss one day and everyone gets cranky!-)

  8. I didn’t even notice the typos! Weird. I guess I’m just used to reading blogs rather than edited content. The point remains valid, though, since most people expect church websites to be perfect.

  9. I didn’t even notice the typos! Weird. I guess I’m just used to reading blogs rather than edited content. The point remains valid, though, since most people expect church websites to be perfect.

  10. I didn’t even notice the typos! Weird. I guess I’m just used to reading blogs rather than edited content. The point remains valid, though, since most people expect church websites to be perfect.