Heal Your Church WebSite


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12 Reasons You Need to Install FireFox … Now!

12 personal(ly installed) reasons you shouldn’t develop church websites without getting plugged-in with the (mostly free) extensions developed for the FireFox browser installed on your computer.

  1. View Cookies – Some websites store cookies on your computer, so these sites can remember you. This can be very handy, but it can also be used to track everything you do on that website. So which websites use cookies and what is stored in those cookies? With the Firefox View Cookies extension, you can find that out easily. You can also remove the cookies.
  2. cuneAform – cuneAform is the community built Editor that anyone can use. cuneAform is designed to edit pieces of (x)HTML code and contains most of the features of the big boys. cuneAform is a community built extension to Mozilla products including FireFox and Mozilla. You can see a demo of cuneAform in action .. provided you’re not using FireFox to block even the good pop-ups.
  3. Copy Plain Text 0.2Have you ever copied text from a website and pasted it into an email program, such as Thunderbird, but been frustrated that the text formatting (bold, italic, font, etc.) were copied with it? This extension copies the text without all the formatting.
  4. Copy Image – Activates the inherent ability to copy images to the clipboard, moves the menu item down one position in the nightlies. That is, this plug-in adds a ‘Copy Image to Clipboard’ choice to the context menu, below ‘Copy Image Location.’
  5. AutoForm – Allows webdevelopers to avoid the boring task of filling out forms while developing. The process of save and load form data can be automated and configured. The form data will be saved into the preferences to its context, which is calculated on the base URI, the form name and and a hash value over all form elements. So every page should have it’s unique key where the values are stored.
  6. WML Browser – View WML (Wireless Markup Language) pages in Mozilla or Mozilla Firefox. In other words, use this to test your markup for your BlackBerry.
  7. IE View – this plugin is a simple Mozilla and Mozilla Firefox extension (for Microsoft Windows systems), which allows the current page or a selected link to be opened in Internet Explorer. While we all prefer to use Mozilla 99.99% of the time, but there are those moments — particularly when testing new pages, or when viewing that rare IE-only page that’s actually interesting — when we need to see what things look like in IE.
  8. Mozedit – an advanced text editor extension for Mozilla Firebird and the Mozilla suite. It was created with web development in mind, this editor offers quick editing of chrome and user.js files, html preview, document history, autobackup, find/replace with regex, JavaScript Console, multiple document buffers, a command line to run programs, and an ‘Edit in Mozedit’ Tools menu option.
  9. EditCSS a useful extension for web developers and web designers, that works for Mozilla Firefox. It allows you to edit current stylesheets of a page in live, and display the result as you type. It appears in a sidebar. The project is based on Jesse Ruderman’s “Edit Style” bookmarklet, that has done the essential work.
  10. JS Console – a tool for JavaScript developers to write and evaluate code snippets or JS files. It provides an interface to use XPCOM components, libraries for I/O and RDF management, dynamic script loading, as well as an assertion unit framework for test-driven development.
  11. Web Developer – Adds a menu and a toolbar to the browser with various web developer tools. Current tools include converting form POSTs to GETs, hiding images, outlining block level elements, disabling styles and many more. In other words — pretty much adds in one neat plug-in many of the individual plug-in capabilities listed above.
  12. Checky – Here is a one-stop, right-click menu interface to a large number of online webpage validaton and analysis services. Warning, once you start …

Now if the good folks at Six Apart would build me an editor/plugin for MovableType, I’d be set. I’m sure you WordPress and pMachine people are thinking along the same lines — then again it’d be nice if WordPress supported multiple blogs — then again, I should really experiment with TextPattern when I get the chance.

So what about you? Installed the FireFox browser yet? If so, what plugins are you using?

15 Comments

  1. Awesome post, Dean. I’m a longtime user of FireFox, but several of these extensions were new to me.

  2. I’ve been using Firefox now for several weeks, but I wasn’t aware of those plug-ins. Great stuff, Dean! Thanks for pointing those out.

  3. Final release of 1.0 comes out in a week. I’m going to save me an upgrade and wait till then (currently 0.9)

  4. MT needs a plugin to function in FF? Is it rich text or something?

    pM has always worked in FF, so does ExpressionEngine – but it’s simple text only.

  5. As per above – long time user of Firefox, but there’s always new extensions out there. Have been using WebDev for a while and can’t imagine life without it.

    WordPress does have some nice bookmarklets that will open up a popup for a new blog entry, and also for bookmarklet (recent link) entries.

    I am also very much enjoying the live bookmark feature in the latest version that puts RSS feeds into bookmarks.

  6. Firefox user here, with 12 points on SpreadFirefox. :) I was surprised to see spyware wasn’t among the list of reasons – that’s why I’ve been encouraging friends to switch.

    Personally, though, my absolute favorite browser (and the one I normally use) is Opera. Simply the best.

  7. Firefox user here, with 12 points on SpreadFirefox. :) I was surprised to see spyware wasn’t among the list of reasons – that’s why I’ve been encouraging friends to switch.

    Personally, though, my absolute favorite browser (and the one I normally use) is Opera. Simply the best.

  8. I completely live and die by the Web Developer Toolbar. A fundamental need for anyone who does any type of web design or development work.

    Also, the imgtag extension (http://extensionroom.mozdev.org/more-info/imgtag) is phenomenal as well. Right-click on an image and select “Make IMG Tag”, and it copies a fully XHTML 1.0 Strict tag to your clipboard, ready to be pasted into an HTML document in your editor or Movable Type entry window or what have you.

  9. Thanks for pointing out a few extensions I’d missed. Look also at the Adblock extension.

  10. Firefox is definatly the best browser on the market. If you’ve ever considered an alternative browser because of IE’s security issues, Firefox is your only choice. It is amazingly faster than Netscape, even approaching IE in “start up” speed. Not only that, but it is much more enjoyable than IE, with powerful and easy to use features such as RSS bookmarks, tabbed browsing, and popup blocking built in.

    Thanks for the post Dean.

    Get Firefox!

  11. Firefox is definatly the best browser on the market. If you’ve ever considered an alternative browser because of IE’s security issues, Firefox is your only choice. It is amazingly faster than Netscape, even approaching IE in “start up” speed. Not only that, but it is much more enjoyable than IE, with powerful and easy to use features such as RSS bookmarks, tabbed browsing, and popup blocking built in.

    Thanks for the post Dean.

    Get Firefox!

  12. spammers, please send yourself email at uce@localhost … hugs and love, mean dean

  13. Pingback: ricky @ samespirit

  14. I use the GMail notifier extension.

    Yes, I know there is a Windows version from Google.

    That’s all for right now…but this list is awesome!