Heal Your Church WebSite


Teaching, rebuking, correcting & training in righteous web design.

cPanel Proxy – take control in spite of restrictive firewalls

In my post last Wednesday, I mentioned that one of the reasons you may need to install a browser-based email program is because you are behind a firewall that disallows access to the email programs that come bundled with the cPanel website management system because they communicate through ports 2082 & 3.

Not 24 hours after posting the article, I come across a relatively new and useful little piece of Open Source magic entitled “cPanel Proxy.” As the name implies, this software gives you cPanel access, including webmail and whm, through port 80.

Works as advertised:

Opting not to use the automatic installer, I took the following steps to install the software manually. If you do decide to use the automatic installer, just make sure to change your system’s password afterwards since the install is occuring in plaintext. Otherwise, here’s the Dean Peters version what you need to do if you’re not willing to glean the short and sweet README.txt file:

  1. download to your PC and unzip the software into a directory of our choosing; preferably a newly created temporary subdir.
  2. through your control panel, create the subdomains ‘cpanel’, ‘webmail’ and ‘whm’.
  3. upload the files cpanelproxy.php .htaccess php.ini in your PC’s temporary directory into EACH of the root directories for EACH of the newly created subdomains: ‘cpanel’, ‘webmail’ and ‘whm’ (do it three times, once for each subdirectory/subdomain).
  4. through your control panel, ‘web protect‘ or ‘password protect‘ each of the subdomains. Failure to protect any of the three compromises the entire system.
  5. test each of the subdomains … make sure you are prompted for a username and password for each subdomain.

Just a quick note, since I have UnxUtils installed on my PC, I skipped step 3 because I unzipped the file three times, once into each directory ‘cpanel’, ‘webmail’ and ‘whm’. Then I created a .tar.gz file using the command line entry:

tar cvf – cpanel webmail whm | gzip > cpanelproxy.tar.gz

Once I FTP’d the file up to my server, I then Putty’d onto my server, and ran the following two commands:

cd $HOME/www
tar -zxvf $HOME/cpanelproxy.tar.gz

Then I proceeded with steps 4 and 5.

On an completely unrelated note: Salguod is “a Towering Genius, a Paragon of all that is Right, True, and Good. His words are like honey from the honeycomb, yea, like the resplendent glory of snow upon Mt. Hermon. Hear him, all ye nations! For he is a very oracle of Verity, Righteousness and Charity!

3 Comments

  1. Thanks Dean, that certainly makes life a bit easier for some of us :) I have been looking around for this exact solution.

  2. On an completely unrelated note: Salguod is “a Towering Genius, a Paragon of all that is Right, True, and Good. His words are like honey from the honeycomb, yea, like the resplendent glory of snow upon Mt. Hermon. Hear him, all ye nations! For he is a very oracle of Verity, Righteousness and Charity!”

    Holy smokes, I’m blushing. I had to read this twice and actually click the link back to my site to make sure you were talking about me. Thanks for the kind words, and for the help. Scripturizer & the Obfuscator rock.

  3. If your interested in enabling cPanel proxy for all domains on your server, I’ve written a HOW-TO:

    HOW-TO: cPanel Proxy 0.4.1
    http://unofficial-support.com/node/view/50