Heal Your Church WebSite


Teaching, rebuking, correcting & training in righteous web design.

XFML Core

Mark Pilgrim once again hits the nail directly on the head when he explains the eXchangeable Faceted Metadata Language (XFML) in the following manner:

‘Think of XFML as a way of expressing all the different cross-sections of a site. For example, each tip in Dive Into Accessibility discusses a specific technique, the general design principles the technique embodies, the type of people … who would benefit from its implementation, the types of disabilities that would benefit, the web browsers involved, and … even specific instructions for implementing the tip in various publishing tools …

To express this in XFML, we first define six top-level facets: design principle, person, physical disability, technological disability, web browser, and publishing tool.

Then, for each page of the book, we write out which topics occur on that page.

Do that for every page, throw it all together, and it looks like this: Dive Into Accessibility XFML. Now feed it into a portal-making script and it looks like a portal. Or feed it into a search-engine-making script and it looks like a search engine. That’s wicked cool.’

Notice MY emphasis on portal-making script. Behind the scenes of blogs4God, I’ve been trying to figure out a way where users would merely ping the system via XML-RPC, and let us know they want to register. Using a format such as XFML, or at least a much smaller node-like structure based upon an XFML element, the system then goes out and pushes the necessary information into our waiting queue, emails the appropriate moderator for final approval. No forms, no typos, no fuss, no muss. You merely give us the URI of the .XFML file and voila, you’ve submitted your site for registration.

That’s some of what I wanted to get out of the WMDI as well. I’ve been in touch with N.Z.Bear. This format might just be the right tool for the job.

And much closer to what Mr. Pilgrim was getting at with his mention of a portal-making script, such a structure lends itself well to an abstraction of the various categories, denomenations and other minutiae that comprises the blogs4God.com community.

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